Completely break down a non-biodegradable plastic with sun energy

Chemists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have discovered a method that could turn plastic waste into valuable chemicals by using sunlight. In lab experiments, the research team mixed plastics with their catalyst in a solvent, which allows the solution to harness light energy and convert the dissolved plastics into formic acid – a chemical used Read more about Completely break down a non-biodegradable plastic with sun energy[…]

Small modular reactor technology for a clean-energy options in Poland

GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy (GEH) and Synthos SA have agreed to collaborate on potential deployment applications for GEH’s BWRX-300 small modular reactor in Poland. Synthos, a manufacturer of synthetic rubber and one of the biggest producers of chemical raw materials in Poland, is interested in obtaining affordable, on-demand, carbon-free electricity from a dependable, dedicated source. Read more about Small modular reactor technology for a clean-energy options in Poland[…]

A sensor that can withstand the crushing forces inside a diamond anvil cell

Since their invention more than 60 years ago, diamond anvil cells have made it possible for scientists to recreate extreme phenomena – such as the crushing pressures deep inside the Earth’s mantle – or to enable chemical reactions that can only be triggered by intense pressure, all within the confines of a laboratory apparatus that Read more about A sensor that can withstand the crushing forces inside a diamond anvil cell[…]

A new look at the industrial testing of the hydrogen resistance of metals

The researchers from Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) and Institute of Problems of Mechanical Engineering of the Russian Academy of Sciences studied the distribution of hydrogen in metals in the process of standard testing for hydrogen cracking. They found that there is a surface effect that does not let hydrogen enter the metal. This can Read more about A new look at the industrial testing of the hydrogen resistance of metals[…]

renewable energy

Solar thermal, geothermal, photovoltaic – what form of energy supply is most suitable for a particular municipality?

Representatives of smaller communities are overwhelmed by a huge amount of information, which tends to exacerbate existing uncertainty. A new online tool from Fraunhofer is now helping to clarify this confusion. The tool calculates the optimal energy mix for each individual case, including funding possibilities available. The transition to a new energy economy is imminent. Read more about Solar thermal, geothermal, photovoltaic – what form of energy supply is most suitable for a particular municipality?[…]

A promising ferroelectric material could bring headphones with better sound and lower power consumption

For a long time, scientists have been investigating so-called ferroelectric materials, which can change their electric polarisation, to enable the development of new data storage options or micro actuators for speakers, for example. However, so far they have been not powerful enough or too unreliable for industrial applications. A promising ferroelectric material, discovered by materials Read more about A promising ferroelectric material could bring headphones with better sound and lower power consumption[…]

New solutions for power plant noise emissions

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and the technology group Wärtsilä have completed a three-year project funded by Business Finland, which created new solutions for power plant noise emissions. New solutions can reduce a power plant’s noise level by 10–20 decibels. In practice, this means a 90–99% reduction in noise footprint. Increasing the use of Read more about New solutions for power plant noise emissions[…]

Titanium-copper alloys could be a new 3D printing option for aerospace and medical devices

Successful trials of titanium-copper alloys for 3D printing could kickstart a new range of high-performance alloys for medical device, defence and aerospace applications. Current titanium alloys used in additive manufacturing often cool and bond together in column-shaped crystals during the 3D printing process, making them prone to cracking or distortion. And unlike aluminium or other Read more about Titanium-copper alloys could be a new 3D printing option for aerospace and medical devices[…]

advanced materials

A new automated system makes it easier for non-experts to create polymers

A Rutgers-led team of engineers has developed an automated way to produce polymers, making it much easier to create advanced materials aimed at improving human health. The innovation is a critical step in pushing the limits for researchers who want to explore large libraries of polymers, including plastics and fibers, for chemical and biological applications Read more about A new automated system makes it easier for non-experts to create polymers[…]

Microlattice material could save better sportives head injuries

HRL Laboratories, LLC, has published test results showing shock-absorbing pads made from HRL’s microlattice an architected elastomeric material had up to 27% more energy absorption efficiency than the current best-performing expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam when sustaining a single impact and up to 48% improved absorption efficiency over the state-of-the-art vinyl nitrile foam when impacted repeatedly. Read more about Microlattice material could save better sportives head injuries[…]

nanotechnology

Nanotechnology using black silicon to detect explosives

Scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, and Melbourne Center for Nanofabrication developed an ultrasensitive detector based on black silicon. The device is able to detect trace amounts of nitroaromatic compounds and can be applied to identify the majority of explosives or Read more about Nanotechnology using black silicon to detect explosives[…]

Quantum computers standardization is on the way

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a method that could pave the way to establishing universal standards for measuring the performance of quantum computers. The new method, called cycle benchmarking, allows researchers to assess the potential of scalability and to compare one quantum platform against another. “This finding could go a long way Read more about Quantum computers standardization is on the way[…]