Energy Storage

This training course provides a comprehensive, business-focused summary of the electricity storage market. It covers the variety of competing storage technologies and describes the wide variety of problems they can address, at a wide range of deployment sizes and timescales. It also considers alternatives to storage and barriers to its market growth, making it essential for those seeking to evaluate risks as well as opportunities. You will leave with a clear understanding of why and where storage markets are growing, what could limit this growth and what the future trends will be. So, if you are thinking of investing in or developing an energy storage business, this course provides your essential grounding in the core issues.

 

The course is designed to provide a clear, independent, business-focused introduction to the subject in language suited to non-engineers; particularly senior, commercial executives and investors. No prior knowledge is required.

Along with presented core information, you’ll examine examples from around the world, discuss market analysis variables and quantify key issues using simple numerical calculations and Excel-based tools.

Benefits of Attending

Speak the language of electricity storage: terminology and concepts explained

Understand the key variables determining the economics of electricity storage projects

Review current and emerging market opportunities for electricity storage

Learn and discuss how financial returns and risks will arise in the electricity storage market

Be better able to converse with storage project partners, suppliers or investors

Know what to look for when evaluating electricity storage market opportunities

Be better able to identify key investment and project performance risks

Learn how to analyse and critique electricity storage business models

Who Should Attend

This course is ideal if:

– You are from the investment community. Electricity storage presents a fast-growing market opportunity which you are keen to investigate, but you want to gain an independent perspective on the competing options, the economic environment in which storage projects operate, and the operational and revenue risks which are important to them.

You are working within the power sector in a commercial or business development role. You need a clearly-explained, multi-faceted understanding of how, where and why electricity storage is disrupting existing markets and business models, so that you can understand new market opportunities and competitive risks facing your own business.

Testimonials

“I not only would recommend him, but I have also been sending my team to his courses. He combines detailed technical expertise with deep knowledge of the (complex) energy markets, also bringing it all together in the context of each relevant regulation and the economic business cases underlying investment decisions. I have enjoyed his courses – and have learnt a lot from them”

– Head of Energy & Natural Resources, Credit Agricole CIB

“This was one of my best spent weeks on training all year! I found the trainer very knowledgeable and enthusiastic in presenting the material, also enabling knowledge exchange between participants in the group. I really enjoyed his interesting lessons and the group work he provided for additional learning outcome. Thanks.”

– Vice Presidents, Statkraft Development AS

“He is a professional trainer with excellent presentation skills. He is able to make simple presentation of complex issues and has a very good knowledge of the renewable energy matters. I highly recommend him as a trainer!”

– Directeur, IDETA

“I attended one of his courses in July 2016. He was personable and very thorough and the course was well researched, interesting and on point. Highly recommended for anyone looking to gain knowledge in Renewable Energy.”

– Head of Environmental Products, Tullett Prebon

If you’re interested in energy storage, then you should seriously consider spending just one extra day to get up to speed on “Grid-connected Electric Vehicles”. After all, from the power system perspective, EVs are simply batteries on wheels. They store energy when they charge, adding to electricity demand. When plugged in, they have the potential to interact with so-called “stationary” energy storage systems – or even to compete with them for energy storage revenue streams.

So take this chance to get the complete energy storage picture: both fixed and mobile.

Abigail Harris

Infocus International Group

Tel: +65 6325 0274 | Email: abigail.harris [at] infocusinternational [dot] com

Web: www.infocusinternational.com/energystorage